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Danny Russel as Abe Lincolon

An Abe Lincoln re-enactor, Danny Russel provided an entertaining and often moving presentation of Lincoln’s life. He cited specific important events, such as the death of two of his children, and his introduction to slavery. He ended with a moving recitation of the Gettysburg Address. The program was part of Chautauqua-Wawasee’s Patriot Days program honoring Independence Day. This presentation, along with a Patriotic Pops concert by Wagon Wheel Symphony of the Lakes was moved indoors to Wawasee High School’s auditorium due to rain. More than 300 local residents enjoined the two events.

Please enjoy this article published by inkfree news.

Native American history

Chautauqua-Wawasee and Syracuse-Wawasee Historical Museum are collaborating to offer the third annual series of three programs that explore the history of Native Americans in northeastern Indiana.  The three programs are presented over a three-day period, September 2-4, with the first two one-hour programs held at the Syracuse Community Center; the third program will be held from 9:00AM to noon on Saturday, September 4, at the Wawasee Area Conservancy Foundation pavilion.  All programs are offered free of charge and open to the public. Each program features presenters with expert knowledge and provides an interactive environment for discussion and hands-on examination of artifacts.

This year’s programs are:

Thursday, September 2, 6:30 – 7:30 at the Syracuse Community Center

Dr. Jeff Pyle will discuss and display a portion of the renowned Fred Bartol Collection of Prehistoric Indian Artifacts.  This is one of the finest collections of mid-west pre-historic Indian relics.  It was compiled by Warsaw’s Fred Bartol, who began collecting at a young age and collected his entire life. Upon his death in 1972, the collection was packed up and put away until Dr. Jeff Pyle acquired it in 2019.

 

Friday, September 3, 6:30 – 7:30 at the Syracuse Community Center

Notre Dame professors and researchers, Dr. Mark Schurr and Dr. Madeleine McLeester will be speaking about what archaeologists know about northern Indiana from the very first humans to settle here over 10,000 years ago through the historic occupations of the Potawatomi and Miami, with a special focus on Kosciusko County. The speakers will also present some new results from their ongoing research, the Kankakee Protohistory Project, which investigates how past societies used the Kankakee Marsh environment as well as changes to the marsh itself through time. Join us as for an evening filled with everything from woolly mammoths to sprawling mound centers, and uncover Indiana’s unique and rich archaeological past.

 

Saturday, September 4, 9:00 – Noon at the Wawasee Area Conservancy Ruddell Pavilion

 

Five individual programs are being offered:

 

Myaamia (Miami Native American) Plant Traditions             9:00 – 10:30

Led by Dani Tippmann at WACF Amphitheater

Follow Myaamia history as we look at the lives of the plants who accompany us on our journey through time. [See insert for more details]

 

French Influence in the Area                                                      10:30 – Noon

Led by Joe Zdziebko

Joe Zdziebko, dressed as a 1750s French Marine will display and discuss his equipment, uniform, musket, furs, maps, etc.  He will also talk about old sayings that are still used today.  [See insert for more details]

 

Flintknapping Hands-on                                                               10:30 – Noon

Led by Jeff Mesaros

Want to know how native American artifacts were made by hand?  Jeff Mesaros will show you how.  And here’s your chance to try making one!

 

Kayak Display                                                                                  10:30 – Noon

Led by Mike Smith

Mike will display and describe his hand-built 17-foot sea kayak.

 

Archaeological Dig for Children                                                   10:30 – Noon

Led by Jamie Clemons

Through this hands-on activity, students will “dig” for artifacts, documenting findings through drawings and notes.

Fine Arts Festival

This Festival brings together 30 local and regional artists from around the northern Indiana area.

The outdoor setting provides a family-friendly environment. Food vendors are onsite for snacks and lunch, with outside seating available. Also, the Pier and Back Porch at Oakwood offers a full menu with both indoor and outdoor lakefront dining overlooking beautiful Lake Wawasee. Children’s activities and playground are available. Attendance is free. Stop by our booth for a giveaway.

 

What: Oakwood Fine Art Festival

When: June 12, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Where: Oakwood Resort, Syracuse, Indiana

Free to attend. Registration requested, but not required

 

Please follow this link to register

Don’t forget to stop by the Chautauqua tent for a giveaway!

 

 

 

Taps Across the Water at Dusk

To honor Memorial Day, Chautauqua-Wawasee and Syracuse American Legion Post 223 are working
together to organize “Taps Across the Water at Dusk” for a May 30 th event.

The playing of Taps will be performed in synchrony by more than thirty buglers positioned strategically around Lake Wawasee,
Syracuse Lake and Papakeechie Lake so it’s audible to all lake residents and boaters.

The organizers are seeking buglers who wish to participate by performing in the event. Interested buglers should contact
Debbie Yankosky at 574-377-7543 or Chris Longenbaugh at 574-529-0566 for more information.

 

Sponsored by: Oakwood Foundation Chautauqua-Wawasee, a 501-c3 non-profit organization provides
life-enriching experiences in support of the Arts, Education, Faith, and Recreation. To learn more see
http://www.chautauquawawasee.org or our Facebook site.

Gardening in the face of a changing climate

John Edgerton of Shelbyville, Michigan returns to Syracuse for a second workshop to explore wholistic, resilient, sustainable techniques for gardening and small farming. He will share his experience and practical knowledge on the importance of healthy soil, healthy plants, and helpful insect habitats. Other topics will include variety selection and ways to account for climate-related imbalances of diseases and insects. He will share what others in the bioregion are doing to address these issues. The Wawasee Area Conservancy Foundation and the Syracuse-Wawasee Garden Club are jointly sponsoring this program with Chautauqua-Wawasee.

What: One hour presentation, followed by deeper discussion.

When: April 24, 1:00 – 4:00

Where: Syracuse Community Center, 1013 N. Long Dr, Syracuse, Indiana

Cost: Free to the Public. Please register to help us estimate attendance.

About the Presenter

John Edgerton lives with his partner and fellow farmer, Amy Newday. Together, they have done both market gardening and community-supported agriculture. John has done dozens of workshops on gardening and seed saving, most recently, at conferences sponsored by the Michigan Food and Farm Alliance, Michigan Integrative Food and Farming Systems, and KEEP GROWING DETROIT. He and Amy have worked with the Inter-Tribal Food Summit to grow out and repatriate several varieties of indigenous Northern Flint Corn. They also work with a network of northern gardeners to perform grow-out trials of Upland Rice varieties to determine suitability for our northern bioregion. John and Amy co-taught a course for seniors at Kalamazoo College on “Slow Farming” a form that is committed to limited and appropriate technology. John co-founded a local community garden in Martin, MI. He has also served as a schoolteacher in the Martin Michigan public school, and, long ago, at The Learning Center, a parent-teacher non-public cooperative elementary school, in Fort Wayne.

2021 Patriot's Day Celebration

Chautauqua-Wawasee is proud to present the 2021 Patriot’s Day Celebration.

Lincoln re-enactor, Danny Russel, brings Lincoln’s wonderful humor, honesty, love of learning, mastery of language, and empathy for his fellow man to life in a one-hour presentation on the lawn at Oakwood Resort.

Chautauqua-Wawasee invites you to start the Patriot’s Day celebration with Lincoln’s tour-de-force at 4:30, then have dinner at Oakwood’s Pier & Back Porch lakeside restaurant, then return to the lawn for the annual 7:30 Patriotic Pops concert by the Wagon Wheel Symphony of the Lakes Orchestra.  Bring a lawn chair or blanket.  Stop by our tent to receive a free patriotic gift.

What:  Lincoln performance by Danny Russel

When:  June 27, 4:30 – 5:30

Where:  Oakwood Resort, Syracuse, Indiana

Tickets: Free

See www.ChautauquaWawasee.org or follow us on Facebook or call 574-377-7543

Old Fashioned Christmas Celebration

For those looking for a unique fun-filled Christmas family activity, Chautauqua-Wawasee, along with the Syracuse Parks Department and Syracuse-Wawasee Chamber of Commerce, plan the 2nd annual Old Fashioned Christmas at Oakwood Resort for November 28, from 6:00 to 8:00. The celebration is open to the public, free of charge, no registration is required.  The event will be held outdoors on the grounds of Oakwood Resort, with activities starting at 6:00 around the tree near the Oakwood Inn.  Wawasee High School choir and bands are slated to be on hand.  At 6:15 the countdown to lighting 7000 lights on Oakwood’s magnificent 70-foot tree begins. After the lighting, Oakwood’s Christmas magic begins with activities sure to get grandma, grandpa, moms, dads, and children of all ages in the Christmas spirit like olden days. Starting at the Oakwood Inn, stroll up the lighted path to see Santa and Mrs. Claus to hear Christmas wishes while taking precautions to keep Santa and children safe from covid-19. Take pictures with the kids! Listen to an elf read the Night Before Christmas. Stop along the path to listen to the old fashion barbershop quartet sing carols. Warm by a yuletide log and sip some hot chocolate while munching on a cookie. Watch out for the Grinch!  Other characters will be roaming the grounds and available for pictures too. Follow the path up past the Live Nativity to the historic Oakwood chapel to hear the Bible’s Christmas story read; social distancing is set to keep everyone safe. And you’ll want to relax and enjoy a horse drawn sleigh ride around the park.  Stop by the Syracuse Chamber of Commerce’s booth to pick up a child’s craft to take home. These are just some of the many fun activities at the Old Fashioned Christmas celebration. Hope for a bit of snow, and dress warmly, and wear a scarf and face mask to protect yourself and others. Stop in the Oakwood Coffee and Creamery or The Pier and Back Porch restaurant as both will be offering specials to guests of the Old Fashioned Christmas celebration. The Syracuse Chamber of Commerce suggests that you come out early to shop small business Saturday in Syracuse from 10 am to 6 pm! A prize patrol will be out and about from 11 am to 1 pm checking in to see who is shopping! You could be a winner if we catch you shopping in Syracuse! Special thanks to our prize sponsor Mohawk Pier & Lift! Stay in touch by visiting our Facebook Page for information and updates.

When: November 27, 6:00 – 8:00 P.M.
Where: Oakwood Resort Inn (outdoor event…dress for the weather)
Syracuse, Indiana
Who: Free to the Public. No registration needed.
Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChautauquaWawasee
Website: www.CHQW.org
Email questions to-   debbie@CHQW.org

second annual Native American series

Chautauqua-Wawasee and Syracuse-Wawasee Historical Museum are collaborating to offer the third annual series of three programs that explore the history of Native Americans in northeastern Indiana.  The three programs are presented over a three-day period, September 2-4, with the first two one-hour programs held at the Syracuse Community Center; the third program will be held from 9:00AM to noon on Saturday, September 4, at the Wawasee Area Conservancy Foundation pavilion.  All programs are offered free of charge and open to the public. Each program features presenters with expert knowledge and provides an interactive environment for discussion and hands-on examination of artifacts.

 

This year’s programs are:

 

Thursday, September 2, 6:30 – 7:30 at the Syracuse Community Center

Dr. Jeff Pyle will discuss and display a portion of the renowned Fred Bartol Collection of Prehistoric Indian Artifacts.  This is one of the finest collections of mid-west pre-historic Indian relics.  It was compiled by Warsaw’s Fred Bartol, who began collecting at a young age and collected his entire life. Upon his death in 1972, the collection was packed up and put away until Dr. Jeff Pyle acquired it in 2019.

 

Friday, September 3, 6:30 – 7:30 at the Syracuse Community Center

Notre Dame professors and researchers, Dr. Mark Schurr and Dr. Madeleine McLeester will be speaking about what archaeologists know about northern Indiana from the very first humans to settle here over 10,000 years ago through the historic occupations of the Potawatomi and Miami, with a special focus on Kosciusko County. The speakers will also present some new results from their ongoing research, the Kankakee Protohistory Project, which investigates how past societies used the Kankakee Marsh environment as well as changes to the marsh itself through time. Join us as for an evening filled with everything from woolly mammoths to sprawling mound centers, and uncover Indiana’s unique and rich archaeological past.

 

Saturday, September 4, 9:00 – Noon at the Wawasee Area Conservancy Ruddell Pavilion

 

Five individual programs are being offered:

 

Myaamia (Miami Native American) Plant Traditions             9:00 – 10:30

Led by Dani Tippmann at WACF Amphitheater

Follow Myaamia history as we look at the lives of the plants who accompany us on our journey through time. [See insert for more details]

 

French Influence in the Area                                                      10:30 – Noon

Led by Joe Zdziebko

Joe Zdziebko, dressed as a 1750s French Marine will display and discuss his equipment, uniform, musket, furs, maps, etc.  He will also talk about old sayings that are still used today.  [See insert for more details]

 

Flintknapping Hands-on                                                               10:30 – Noon

Led by Jeff Mesaros

Want to know how native American artifacts were made by hand?  Jeff Mesaros will show you how.  And here’s your chance to try making one!

 

Kayak Display                                                                                  10:30 – Noon

Led by Mike Smith

Mike will display and describe his hand-built 17-foot sea kayak.

 

Archaeological Dig for Children                                                   10:30 – Noon

Led by Jamie Clemons

Through this hands-on activity, students will “dig” for artifacts, documenting findings through drawings and notes.

 A look at women’s suffrage in Indiana with Marsha Miller

By Mary Hursh

   Over the past month, area residents have learned quite a bit about the woman’s suffrage movement which began in 1848 and culminated with the ratification of the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote on August 26, 1920.

Speakers and events sponsored by Chautauqua-Wawasee and the Syracuse-Wawasee Historical Museum, Syracuse Public Library, Syracuse-Wawasee Chamber of Commerce and Indiana Humanities have introduced readers of the Mail Journal to many of the women involved in the fight for the vote. On September 5, Marsha Miller will present a program titled “From Amanda to Zerelda: Hoosier Suffragists Who Raised a Ruckus.”

Miller’s presentation to be held at the Syracuse Community Center on Saturday, September 5 from 2-3:30 p.m., will detail the “ruckus” caused by women involved in the suffrage movement.  She describes it by saying “I have done a version of this program for several years. I will present a timeline which highlights the many ways women were stopped from speaking and expressing the need to have the vote. Nationally, women endured many hardships in the long struggle for the vote including forced feedings and standing as silent sentinels for hours on end trying to bring their cause to light.”

The “Amanda” in the title refers to Amanda Way (1828-1914), and the “Zerelda” in the title refers to Zerelda Gray Wallace (1817-1901). Way was deemed the mother of the women’s rights movement in Indiana and a founding member of the Indiana Woman’s Rights Association (1851). Wallace was the first lady of Indiana from 1837-1840. She formed the Equal Suffrage Society of Indianapolis and lobbied heavily to win the vote. She instigated several letter-writing campaigns, gathered petitions, and gave several speeches in support of suffrage, including in front of the U.S. Senate Committee (1870).

Miller’s presentation will feature historical costumes and suffragists songs. She says “People will not know the songs, but they will know the melodies. Suffragists created songs, poems, stories and plays. The lyrics to their songs were matched to tunes everyone would be familiar with, especially the “Battle Hymn of the Republic.” The songs helped to stir up positive and patriotic emotions which caused audiences to think favorably about women getting the vote.” Terre Haute personages Ida Husted Harper (1851-1931) and Eugene (1855-1926) and Kate Debs (1867-1936), will also be featured. Harper was the biographer of Susan B. Anthony and co-editor with her of the six-volume History of Woman Suffrage. Eugene and Kate Debs were supporters of full equal rights for women through their involvement with politics.

“I hope the audience on Saturday will take away some basic facts about suffrage as it was in Indiana. There is so much history hiding in local archives, on microfilm, in a historical society or a folder of clippings. I hope the people listening to my presentation will make it a point to look at primary sources in the library to learn about this state-wide movement,” said Miller. 

(*** To view lecture on Saturday at 2pm eastern time via Zoom, please click here***)

Women in the suffrage movement used many techniques and strategies to present an organized front. “ When I visited the Sewall-Belmont House ( now the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument)  in Washington, DC., I learned that women kept cards of information on U.S. legislators, so in their lobbying efforts, they knew what legislators were for or against suffrage and if the legislator was a Republican or a Democrat.” Telegraphs, letters, and eventually phone calls were used as networking tools to get the word out to women. Their planning was unbelievable.”

Marsha Miller earned her bachelor of arts in history from Central Michigan University and her masters of library science from the University of Michigan. She was the periodicals reference librarian at Arkansas State University for five years and has been at Indiana State University since 1985 as a research and instructional librarian. There she is tied specifically to the College of Health and Human Services where she works with social work, physical education, occupational and physical therapy and sometimes nursing. “I also work with our School of Music which gives me the most personal joy, as I am a clarinetist, and with our Multidisciplinary Studies Department, which houses our Gender Studies program, part of the reason and inspiration for my development of this presentation.”

“There are so many interesting things to learn about suffrage. I now have a stack of books to read to learn what women did after they got the vote. I enjoy reading about Ida Husted Harper. I have been purposely collecting children’s books on women’s suffrage. One interesting book I read on the subject is The Hope Chest, by Karen Schwabach, written about the final weeks of suffrage ratification in Tennessee. Two little girls are the main characters. I have been collecting children’s books on women’s suffrage from the 80s and 90s.”

In keeping with her interest in suffrage, Miller contributes articles to the monthly publication called Terre Haute Living Magazine. “This year, I will have one article in that publication from August through November.”

Miller has spent a lengthy period of time at Indiana State University. “I feel that I can make a difference here at Indiana State University. In my main role, I have conducted more than 4,800 library/research instruction sessions. I have been able to serve on a number of campus committees. Currently I am working with our University College Council, which works with first-year students within our Foundational Studies program.  

This article is the seventh in a series on the Women’s Suffrage Centennial sponsored by Chautauqua-Wawasee, Syracuse-Wawasee Historical Museum, Syracuse Public Library, Syracuse-Wawasee Chamber and Indiana Humanities. All events are free and open to the public.

Chautauqua-Wawasee is a non-profit organization which provides life enriching programs for the northern Indiana region.

Mary Hursh is a freelance writer who lives on Syracuse Lake with her husband Stanley.

 

Mapping Indiana Women’s Suffrage Movement

By Mary Hursh

 

The women’s suffrage movement spanned decades. In 1911, the Woman’s Franchise League of Indiana was formed and became the propelling force for the right to vote. Women from all walks of life participated in the many marches, campaigns, and demonstrations that finally resulted in the passage of the l9th Amendment granting women the right to vote.

Chautauqua-Wawasee, in partnership with the Syracuse-Wawasee Historical Museum, the Syracuse Public Library, the Syracuse-Wawasee Chamber and Indiana Humanities, has a number of events and expert speakers planned for Syracuse to highlight and educate about right-to-vote movement.

On August 26, from 6:30-7:30 p.m., the Oakwood Resort will host the first speaker in the women’s suffrage centennial celebration.  It is free to attend.

Melissa Gentry, from Ball State University, will map the Indiana women’s suffrage movement and its leaders in her presentation titled “From Seneca Falls to Seymour and South Bend: Mapping Indiana’s Suffrage History.”

“I create Indiana history maps for the Ball State University Map Collection for use by K-12 teachers and research. So, it seemed natural to create a map about Indiana suffrage. For me, picturing where some significant event happened or where a popular speaker like Sojourner Truth visited or where a suffragist lived connects me to the story. A map is a good visual aid to show how the cause of suffrage was happening in small towns, on farms, working class families, African-American churches, and prominent club women in big cities.” For Gentry, seeing the diversity of cultures and geography is an important part of the story.

Gentry chose her topic because one of the important women of the suffrage movement in Indiana was from South Bend. Her name was Emma Barrett Molloy (1839-1907). She became the first female newspaper co- editor in northern Indiana in 1867 for the South Bend National Union. She also wrote articles for other national newspapers and some popular women’s suffrage journals. She traveled the country as a public speaker for the cause of suffrage after the Civil War. “This was revolutionary for that time since most women did not participate in the public sphere, especially politics,” said Gentry.

Gentry, who holds degrees in history and geography, is the supervisor, of the Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection. She has worked at the university since June 2001.

“I provide instructional sessions and programs for English, education, social studies, history, architecture, urban planning, women’s studies, geography, and even art classes for various professors. Through my work with the Library of Congress’ Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission, I attended the opening reception for the Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the vote exhibition opening reception in June 2019 in Washington, D.C., where Nancy Pelosi was the main speaker.”

Gentry credits her grandmother, who worked for Indiana Senator Birch Bayh, the author of Title IX and the Equal Rights Amendment, for her interest in women’s history.

This article is the fifth in a series on the Women’s Suffrage Centennial sponsored by Chautauqua-Wawasee, Syracuse-Wawasee Historical Museum, Syracuse Public Library, Syracuse-Wawasee Chamber and Indiana Humanities. All events are free and open to the public.

Chautauqua-Wawasee is a non-profit organization which provides life enriching programs for the northern Indiana region.

Mary Hursh is a freelance writer who lives on Syracuse Lake with her husband Stanley.