John Wooden

It is remarkable how little many Hoosiers know about the history of our state and the amazing people it has spawned. Some of the greatest athletes, composers, entertainers, entrepreneurs, innovators, leaders, musicians, philanthropists, politicians, preachers, public servants, scientists, teachers, and writers in U.S. history were nurtured by this soil.  Chautauqua-Wawasee has embarked on an annual series to highlight Hoosiers who have impacted America. John Wooden will lead off this series with a presentation by Dr. Richard Gunderman, author of the book “Hoosier Beacons”. When you hear his presentation, you will be amazed at the nature and accomplishments of the man discussed and you will want to be a better person by simply hearing about Wooden’s long and successful life.

WHEN: July 13, 2024, beginning with refreshments at 4:30 PM followed by the presentation from 5:00 PM to 6:00 PM.

WHERE: Oakwood Resort, located at 702 E. Lake View Road, Syracuse Indiana.

Ben Franklin: In His Own Words

Ask Ben Franklin: In His Own Words

As part of Chautauqua’s annual Patriotic Speaker Series, the 2024 program will feature American patriot Ben Franklin. The performance will feature professional actor Barry Stevens as Ben Franklin. Meet and discuss events with this man, the most famous man in America at the time he lived. Franklin has a long list of accomplishments: printer, inventor (the Franklin stove, of course, the armonica, the lightning rod and an odometer, to name a few), scientist, politician, musician, postmaster, satirist and founder of the University of Pennsylvania and the first fire department in the colonies. In fact, Stevens says, Franklin is considered the “patron saint” of fire departments. As he traveled to locations throughout the Colonies, he was known as Dr. Franklin, and even traveled to Paris, France.

Barry Stevens has been presenting Benjamin Franklin while participating as a member of a company of Revolutionary War re-enactors since 2005. The performer has requested attendees to come with questions to “Ask Ben” which allows him to share historical information and anecdotes.

The performance is on June 30 from 4:30-5:30 at the Wawasee High School auditorium, in Syracuse Indiana. The program is free to attend.
Also in Syracuse, at 7:30, the annual Patriotic Pops concert by the Fort Wayne Philharmonic Orchestra is performed on the lawn at Oakwood Resort.

Stop by the Chautauqua tent for a free flag and glow light. Attendance is free for this family-friendly event.
Visit us on Facebook, or give us a call at 574-377-7543 for more information.

Does Nature Love Us Back?

Everyone says they love nature, but does nature love us back? And how would we know?
This topic will be explored at an upcoming Chautauqua program on Saturday, November 4 at the Syracuse Community Center.
The program will be a fun, educational, and interactive session co-hosted by Diane Hunter, Cliff Kindy, and John Edgerton who have spent their lifetimes working with plants, animals, water, and soil. Each of the program leaders will focus on a different topic in addressing the question “Does Nature Love Us Back”. The program is a family event and is free to attend.
ABOUT THE SPEAKERS
Diane Hunter has served as the Myaamia Heritage Preservation Specialist for the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and is a citizen and elder of the Tribe.  Her expertise is in the history of the Myaamia People, their cultural experience, artistic and story-telling nature. Earth-centered wisdom has been a part of Myaamia culture and life since time immemorial.
Cliff Kindy is an organic farmer who does all his gardening and life needs on captured and recycled water and without using fossil fuel. Cliff has, over thirty years, traveled with Christian Peacemaking Teams worldwide to stand with indigenous people in the face of violent, unjust regimes.
John Edgerton has done organic market gardening and community-supported agriculture based on limited and appropriate technology. John and his partner Amy co-teach Slow Farming at Kalamazoo College to give fourth-year students a hands-on immersion in farming and gardening skills. Their passion is saving and stewarding seeds.
WHEN: Saturday, November 4th -6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
WHERE: Syracuse Community Center 1013 N Long Dr, Syracuse IN
COST: FREE!

More than just street names and artifacts, the Myaamaia community is a vibrant contemporary people whose history has shaped many of our lives here in Indiana. Today we have an opportunity to talk to two members of the Miami Tribe about their history and continued presence in Indiana.

Presenters: Diane Hunter and Dani Tippmann. Diane Hunter will talk about the history of Miami people since time immemorial, telling the stories of their emergence as a unique and different people, their first encounters with Europeans and later with Americans, land loss and forced removals, and about the revitalization of the Miami Tribe today. Diane is the Myaamia Heritage Preservation Specialist for the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and a citizen of the Tribe. She is a descendant of the Miami family of Seekaahkweeta and Palaanswa (Francois Godfroy).

Dani Tippmann, a tradition bearer and a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, will be discussing the use of plants as food, medicine, technology, and cultural historical conduits. Plants teach us, feed us, heal us, and bring us a better understanding of Myaamia culture and lifeways. Dani will have plants to touch, smell and maybe even taste. Dani was Director of the Whitley County Historical Museum from 2008-2022. She currently serves as Kiihkayonki Community Food Program Director.

When: September 9 at 10:00.

Where: WACF Ruddell pavilion

Northeastern Indiana Digging Through History-Day 3-Multiple Speakers

 

Bring Your Own Artifact Led by Jim Bickel & Michelle Edington

Do you have an old artifact that you aren’t sure what it is or when/where it originated? Jim and Michelle are available to examine your artifact and (hopefully) tell you all about it.

 

Five Medals Living History Led by Mike Judson

Five Medals was such an important leader in our region that an organization and an event have been named in his honor. Reenactors will have numerous artifacts to share plus excerpts from the exciting history of the 1812 era.

 

1750s French Marine Led by Joe Zdziebko

Joe Zdziebko, dressed as a 1750s French Marine will display and discuss his equipment, uniform, musket, furs, maps, etc. He will also talk about old sayings that are still used today.

 

Flintknapping Hands-on Led by Jeff Mesaros

Want to know how Native American artifacts were made by hand? Jeff Mesaros will show you how. And here’s your chance to try making one!

 

Atlatl Weapon Demonstration Led by Jamie Clemons

The atlatl was a tool that uses leverage to achieve greater velocity in dart or spear-throwing, and includes a bearing surface which allows the user to store energy during the throw. Jamie will be demonstrating types from around the nation and let you participate with samples. You can try it too!

 

Metal Detecting in Archaeology Led by Angie Butler

Metal detectors can play a key role in discovering historical artifacts. You’ll be amazed at the display of items found under the waters of Lake Wawasee and along its shoreline.

You may reserve your spot by registering HERE.

Date and time:

Saturday, September 2 · 10am – 12pm EDT

Location:
Wawasee Area Conservancy 11586 Indiana 13 Syracuse, IN 46567

Chautauqua Wawasee regularly teams with the Syracuse-Wawasee Historical Museum to provide programs focused on local (Syracuse-area) history, typically related to archaeology, Native American artifacts, and people. Feedback Forms are provided at these events so we can receive feedback on program quality, speaker quality, etc. including requests for desired future programs. Our most frequent request is to provide More Programs on Local History. This is what prompted the Wawasee Walk Down Memory Lane project.

The 2023 program will attract an audience to view three historic videos:

1. A 1937 video of someone cruising in a boat videotaping the Wawasee shoreline and lakefront cottages as they cruise
2. A promotional video for the Spink Wawasee Hotel (built in 1926, closed in 1947)
3. A 1957 video of the Chinese Gardens and cottage on Wawasee

After the showing, attendees will be invited to share their memories via an Open Microphone; these will be recorded and limited to 5 minutes at this venue, but invited for a longer session at the Syracuse-Wawasee Historic Museum to record the individual’s memories as oral history. The event’s promotion will discuss the need for additional “home movies” that might be stored in attics, closets, basements, etc. This will be requested at the event too, with the hope that more historic video material will emerge. The Syracuse-Wawasee Historical Museum will borrow (take temporary possession) to process materials that emerge. With the owner’s signed approval, local home movies would be digitized and made available for public showing at phase two 2024 event.

WHEN: July 22, 2:00 – 3:30
WHERE: Syracuse Community Center

Dominique Rousseau: 1st Permanent White Resident of Kosciusko County

Lynn Brown’s novel Furs and Fevers is based on Rousseau’s life from 1825-1840. Why did a president of an international fur trade company make his home in Kosciusko County? What business obstacles did he overcome? Besides a reading of Chapter One to give you the feel of this person, Lynn will talk about related research principles and sources she used. Kosciusko towns and locations mentioned in the book are Leesburgh (the original spelling), Warsaw, and the Oswego location of Rousseau’s last trading post. After the presentation, questions will be welcome.

 

About the Presenter: Lynn MacKaben Brown

 

Lynn MacKaben Brown has been a Kosciusko County resident for fifty years—and became a permanent one when she married Ed Brown of the Brown/Lynch pioneer family clan. She has been published in national and international magazines for decades. She is also the author of Christmas Celebration, a devotional/activity book.

“When I brought my girls home to homeschool them, Indiana history was required. I didn’t like the textbook but, being from Wisconsin, my knowledge about Indiana’s history was limited to knowing that it was a Union state in the Civil War. While researching class materials, I came across Rousseau. I was and still am intrigued that this important man was left out of so many sources, and nothing has been named for him. I decided to rectify the situation.”

 

This event is free, however, we ask that you register HERE.

WHEN: Friday, September 1 · 6:30 – 7:30pm

WHERE: Syracuse Community Center

1013 North Long Drive Syracuse, IN 46567

 

The Treaty of Paradise Spring, originally known as the Treaty of Mississinewa, was negotiated just two blocks from the current location of the Wabash County Museum. The treaty ultimately made way for the Michigan Road and the Wabash-Erie Canal. Papakeechie’s Reserve was one of several reservations created by this treaty. Many of the Native people who negotiated on behalf of the Miami and Potawatomi lived very close to or within what would become Wabash County.

About the Presenter: T.J. Honeycutt

TJ Honeycutt is the ex-Director of Archives and Outreach at the Wabash County Museum. He is a lifelong resident of Wabash County, a graduate of Manchester University with a Bachelor’s in History and Economics. He left Wabash to pursue a career in e-sports broadcasting after college, but in early 2017 returned to Wabash to work with history at the Museum in early 2017. TJ specializes in local and Russian history.

 

Date and time:

Thursday, August 31 · 6:30 – 7:30pm EDT

Location:

Syracuse Community Center

1013 North Long Drive Syracuse, IN 46567

Reserve your seats HERE.

WACF Earth Day

Love Nature? Love butterflies? This is the topic to be explored at one session of the upcoming Wawasee Area Conservancy Foundation’s Earth Day Festival on May 6th, 2023. WACF is organizing more than twenty educational, fun, hands-on programs and activities to be held outdoors at WACF Education Center south of Syracuse.

Plan to stop by the Chautauqua-Wawasee booth because they need your help to save the Monarch butterfly!

You will learn from the butterfly lady herself, Cindy Gackenheimer, Flutterby Gardens, Claypool, as she shares about the metamorphosis of a butterfly, the Monarch migration pattern this year, and practical steps you can take to help the Monarch. The booth will provide a “kid-friendly” hands-on learning
experience where participants can play a migration game. Also, a special craft is offered which involves stamping the butterfly life cycle on a take-home canvas bag, along with free pollinator seeds to plant which attracts butterflies to your garden or landscape for years to come.

Cost: Free
When: Saturday, May 6,  10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Where: Wawasee Area Conservancy Foundation, located at 11586 IN-13, south of Syracuse.

Check back here, or on Facebook for updates, or feel free to give us a call at 574-377-7543.

2022 Cliff Kindy Workshop

2022 Cliff Kindy Workshop

What if Christians had the passion for peacekeeping that warriors have for war?
Participate in an evening with author and peace-seeker Cliff Kindy, an Indiana organic farmer.
Cliff will share about his many Christian Peacemaker Team journeys (Iraq, Sudan, Iran…), and how he became part of CPTs. The workshop will explore and discuss how Christians who are passionate about peace (everywhere) can pursue the vision of peacekeeping.  Cliff’s session promises to be eye-opening and extremely moving.

Cliff’s book Resurrection Peacemaking recounts his thirty years working with Christian Peacemaker Teams (CPT), facing violent, unjust regimes in Iraq, Colombia, Israel/Palestine, Nigeria, Mexico, and other trouble spots around the world. Cliff and other CPT volunteers have repeatedly put their lives on the line as they chose to accompany targeted and beleaguered indigenous people who were striving to end violent occupation and warfare in their own lands.
This striving is not only for far-away peoples. It is for us.

Cliff says, “Why will people be willing to risk their lives to confront violence or injustice? For me, that willingness is grounded in the gospel story of Jesus’ resurrection. For others, it will be based in love and goodness. Nonviolence for me is powered by the spirit of resurrection on Easter; it topples empires. But it also exposes the practitioner to transformation; all parties are transformed, or better, ‘plowshared’. Are we willing to nurture our imaginations and take the risks required to replace violence with nonviolence? If so, how would this change America, in terms of policing, politics, wars, family disputes, mass killings, and criminal justice?”

What: Presentation/Discussion/Workshop
When: Sept 28, 6:30-8:30pm
Where: Oakwood Resort Event Center
Cost: Free– Please REGISTER HERE for this event